Slaying Giants

This blog post will contain some Christian references, but it also focuses on writing.

Sunday’s church sermon was on how David killed the giant, Goliath. The visiting pastor talked about how big and tall Goliath was, and how he wore heavy battle armor. This Philistine was intimidating to the Israel people. Who could defeat this menacing giant?

To urge someone to come forward to fight Goliath, King Saul offered one of his daughters to marry and for the family to be exempt from paying taxes. Still no one answered the call until a shepherd boy expressed his interest in 1 Samuel 32-33:

“‘Don’t worry about a thing,’ David told him [Saul]. ‘I’ll take care of this Philistine.’”

“Saul replied. … ‘You’re only a boy and he [Goliath] has been in the army since he was a boy!’”

However, David was not deterred even when he threw off the weighty armor Saul gave him to fight the giant. David would slay Goliath on his own terms.

The odds were against David. But with one swift swirl of his slingshot, the rock hit Goliath on his forehead, and the giant fell dead to the ground.

This reminds me of our own writing battles. We work hard to make our work the best we can do. We edit and edit, research and research for historical accuracy, we promote and promote to secure readers and yet at times we feel just like the Israel people – intimidated and hopeless.

This year I made an oath that I would depend upon God and not worry. There are a few days that hopeless feeling returns once more within me, such as this weekend at a writers’ conference.

It took a couple of hours for me to set up my booth, so I could sell my books during Saturday’s lunch and conference breaks. I had practiced reading from my recent historical, clean and Christian romance, When Hearts Rekindle, wanting to entice those hearing my Friday night reading to visit my book booth on Saturday.

For all my efforts, I sold one book, my first book, Seasons of the Soul, which includes a spattering of personal accounts of my two different autistic sons. It took me time to get over my sinking feeling of all my efforts to result in one sale; however, grateful I am for that sale. But to be honest, I had hoped for more, not a lot, but perhaps three to four sales. At least with that, the $10 booth would have paid for itself.

The next day I shook myself awake from my despair and renewed my commitment to God. As a Christian, I must believe the word of the Lord, “all things are possible to him that believeth.” (Mark 9:23) That does not mean there are not troubling times.

However, overall, each year gets better and so, I say to you, keep trudging along. Do not let your fret overtake you and continue to write, tweak your manuscripts and move forward. You are doing better than when you started. Why? Because you have learned from your past mistakes and so you are more prepared today than you were yesterday. Grab your pencil and paper – or should I say your word program and computer? – and  type and write! God bless.

 

8 Comments Add yours

  1. Very well said, Janet.

  2. Thank you, William Kendall. It was a rough one to write. God bless.

  3. This is just what I needed today. We get so caught up in our writing that it’s easy to forget the lesson you just gave. Thanks.

  4. I’m glad this was what you needed. You do get caught up on your writing and forget how far you have come from where you started. God bless.

  5. ericaligocki says:

    Wow! This is great! Thanks for opening up by using your personal story. That must’ve been hard. Us writers attach our hearts to everything we write. Well, at least I do!
    If you have a chance, please check out my page. My last post was a poem but I typically write about what God has put on my heart!

    1. Thank you, ericaligocki. It was difficult to share my personal story, and the struggles we writers face. However, I think people also need to see what really goes on and not the writers’ images they see in movies, etc. Yes, God puts certain things on our hearts, and it is wonderful you are following through with what God has directed you to do. The Lord’s blessings to you.

  6. It is hard to take the focus off of the problems, isn’t it? I struggle with that a lot. I love your advice of moving forward. You’re right. We aren’t where we started. Every step forward is still progress, even when it doesn’t seem like it. Thanks for writing such a beautiful post! It’s definitely a timely one!

  7. Yes, Ruth Ann Nordin, we are bombarded with many problems from our writing to our families and more. It is difficult to move forward at times. Last year, I was in such a depression I did not know if I could ever write again. However, we have to look long term, and whatever we encounter things we do seem to move forward through those topsy-turvy times even in ways we could never imagine. However, when we look back, God has given us the right one after all. God bless.

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